LOVE AND WORK – HANDS AND FEET

Freud said, “Love and work are the cornerstones of our humanness.” Most of us give an ordinate amount of time and attention to our work. Do you spend as much time cultivating the love in and of your life as you do your work? Likely we all need to refine that balance. The other day in yoga the teacher said, “I can tell who’s been doing yoga for a long time, by what they do...
Read More

10 Reasons Why You Want to Take a Dermoneuromodulation Workshop

TEN REASONS WHY YOU WANT TO TAKE A DERMONEUROMODULATION WORKSHOP by Jeff Rockwell 1) Learn to approach your practice, and your clients, with a neurological mindset. 2) Learn to become a scholar-practitioner (it is sexier than it sounds) 3) Learn how to work with your clients' critter brain and their human brain 4) Learn the client's role in manual therapy 5) L...
Read More

THE POETICS OF TOUCH by David Lauterstein (after Gaston Bachelard)

DISCLAIMER: The following piece will likely be most relevant to advanced bodyworkers and practitioners of other CAM therapies who enjoy a philosophical “bent”. I realize it is somewhat densely philosophical! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to email me at DavidL@TLCschool.com. Introduction This essay, “The Poetics of Touch” arose from insights while teachi...
Read More

THIRTEEN RULES OF MASSAGE

by David Lauterstein 1. Slow down when you need to. Speed up when you don’t need to slow down. Massage that’s always slow is ultimately boring massage. 2. Palpate – how can you love if you don’t know what’s there? 3. Know anatomy – not just in general. Have memorized the origins, insertions and actions for at least the 90 most important muscles. 4. Care; really care; let ...
Read More

Deep Massage: The Lauterstein Method – Why Isn’t It Called Deep Tissue?

I studied with Daniel Blake, former Rolfer, in his offshoot of Rolfing, “Structural Bodywork” in 1982 and ‘83. Then I took cranio-sacral trainings with him and with early students of Dr. John Upledger. After my first such training, I realized that you can affect someone deeply with almost no pressure. So I abandoned the term “Deep Tissue”, and decided not to coin some fancy nam...
Read More

The Heart’s Evolution

by David Lauterstein The recent elections’ results continue to be a clarion call. Perhaps the most important message is that the world has reached a new limit of how far we can proceed with only the education of the mind. Because as long as mental prowess is the main focus of our education, the heart is left behind. Abandoned, the undereducated heart remains comparatively ba...
Read More

I HAVE A DREAM – and it’s in my bones!

by David Lauterstein, LMT, Cert. ZB Years ago I received the gift of hearing Martin Luther King speak in person. I hope you’ll excuse me if I bring some of his inspirational tone into this little essay. I just can’t resist. The reason I can’t resist is I have a dream too. And I know you as a student or as a bodyworker do too. It is the dream to help create through my w...
Read More

DON’T IGNORE THE INTERCOSTALS

by David Lauterstein “Anything with wings always comes down in the end”. ~ Simone Weil One of the most important groups of muscles often ignored by massage therapists is the intercostal muscles. These of course give rise to the deliciousness of “spare ribs”. But far more importantly they are core muscles involved more or less in every breath. The reluctance to work them s...
Read More

I COME OUT OF THE ILIOPSOAS CLOSET!

By David Lauterstein I’ve just taught a one-day class on the iliopsoas. It was wonderful and we explored not only the anatomy and techniques for that fascinating muscle, but equally its important neighbors. The “psoas,” because hidden and elevated to pedestal status by Rolfers and others, has enjoyed a somewhat inflated reputation. On the other hand, gluteus maximus ...
Read More

Massage Can Be a Light at the End of the Carpal Tunnel (video included)

By David Lauterstein What is the “carpal tunnel”? The main nerve and tendons going to your palm and your fingers run through the middle of the wrist. On the palmar side of your wrist there is a ligament running above them. It’s called the “transverse carpal ligament”. This ligament is basically the roof of the carpal tunnel – it helps hold these tendons (NINE tendons!...
Read More